Big voices support less and better meat

By : Eating Better
May 16, 2017

Former US President Barrack Obama and London Mayor, Sadiq Khan, back less and better meat.

None other than former US President, Barrack Obama, is raising awareness of the links between diet and climate change and the need to cut back on meat eating. Speaking at the Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan this month, Obama stressed that the need to change habits will only become more important because the globe is on track to increase the meat consumption. Large populations in India, Vietnam, and China are already showing signs of eating more meat and dairy products as their income levels rise.

 

“That doesn’t mean that we can’t teach you and me to have a smaller steak, for our own health,” Obama said. “It doesn’t mean we can’t make progress in educating the advanced world about the need to reduce, just for dietary reasons, the amount of meat that we consume at any given meal.”

 

Obama talking at the Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan. See the full video 

 

Meanwhile back in the UK, London Mayor, Sadiq Khan has said in a letter to Sir Paul McCartney and the Meat Free Monday campaign – one of Eating Better’s partner organisations:

“The New London Food Strategy will include a focus on ways in which London can reduce the environmental impact of its food system, including through healthy eating. One of its priorities will be how we can use the economic, health and environmental potential of food procurement across London to make Londoners healthier, including through eating less, and higher welfare, meat.”

In his letter the London Mayor says that during National Vegetarian Week (15-21 May) the café at City Hall will serve exclusively vegetarian food from its hot counters. This will be supported by messaging, posters and recipe cards to promote the benefits to people of switching to a healthy diet – which may include less meat – if they choose.

Eating Better welcomes the Mayor’s support for less and better meat and hopes it will inspire other cities to follow suit.